Tag Archives: Columbus

Building on our expectations

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.” Mark Twain made that observation years ago when jokingly offering his philosophy on what it takes to stay healthy.  Obviously, his expectations for lasting health were not too high.

Today we are treated to a similar message through various sources that a disease-free life is practically impossible to maintain without the intervention of diets, drugs, exercise routines, therapies, and more.  With the constant barrage in media to “do this to stay healthy,”  we are accepting a subtle, but relentless sub-message that illness is inevitable.

What are your health prospects?  It is an important question.  If living by a “Murphy’s Law” mentality you are essentially portending anything that can go wrong will happen to you at some point in time adding to a life full of doubt and anxiety.

On the other hand, giving your consent to living a life grounded by spiritual, guiding principles that supersede health uncertainties empowers you to be the expression of wellness.  Read more…

Thankful in a tumultuous year

Could things be anymore divided?

Protest, distrust, hatred, and violence scarred the year, but the President thoughtfully shared his impression: “The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies.”

Abraham Lincoln’s gracious assessment of 1863 is immortalized in the opening line of his first Thanksgiving Day Proclamation. And it offers insight into a healing response to this year’s unrest.

Over 150 years have passed since Lincoln’s establishment of an annual, national observance of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.”  In 1863 that day came just one week after the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg where Lincoln gave his celebrated two minute address. The War Between the States would go on for another year and a half.

What prompted Lincoln to articulate such a “healthful” outlook, where many saw only servitude to gloom and despair, was an intensified appreciation for blessings and their origin.   Read more…

Throwing some light on the subject

To put out a fire, throw water on it. To stop shivering, throw on a coat. And in a broader sense, to erase the darkness of ignorance and fear, which often leads to malice and hate, throw light on it.

HealthInkLogo (1)My little granddaughter, Anna, and I were playing in my office one day.  She was not in a very good mood when she purposely turned on my floor lamp. One of its lights points downward, so I put my hands under it, pretending to amass as much light as I could and threw it on her.

She proceeded to do likewise, cupping her tiny hands under the bulb and tossing what she had collected in my direction. This game went on for some time, each of us gathering the light, pouring it on the other’s head, gleeful over our cleverness.  Read more…

 

Boots on a spiritual rock

Wednesday, November 11, marks the observance of Veterans’ Day in the U.S. This is a reprint of an earlier column.

“Nothing can separate you from the love of God,” she gently spoke to him.  With all the confusion surrounding them, she continued to pray with the man she was kneeling over.  It was September 11, 2001.

One of the first female chaplains ever called to active duty, Retired Colonel Janet Horton has had some pretty intense experiences.  In her distinguished career as a Christian Science Military Chaplain, she has seen duty around the globe helping the men and women who serve in the military to keep soul and body together.

Returning to the States after her overseas deployment, Horton was hoping for a post in Georgia. She was assigned to the Pentagon.  At the time she considered it a questionable assignment at best.  “I thought this was a big mistake” she said when I spoke with her, but through prayer she came to the conclusion that God doesn’t slipup.   She eventually came to realize that she was at the right place at the right time.

The morning of September 11, 2001…Read more…

Boots on a spiritual rock

Tuesday, November 11, marks the observance of Veterans’ Day in the U.S. This is a reprint of a column that appeared last year.

 

“Nothing can separate you from the love of God,” she gently spoke to him.  With all the confusion surrounding them, she continued to pray with the man she was kneeling over.  It was September 11, 2001.

iStock photo
iStock photo

One of the first female chaplains ever called to active duty, Retired Colonel Janet Horton has had some pretty intense experiences.  In her distinguished career as a Christian Science Military Chaplain, she has seen duty around the globe helping the men and women who serve in the military to keep soul and body together.

Returning to the States after her overseas deployment, Horton was hoping for a post in Georgia. She was assigned to the Pentagon.  At the time she considered it a questionable assignment at best.  “I thought this was a big mistake” she said when I spoke with her, but through prayer she came to the conclusion that God doesn’t slipup.   She eventually came to realize that she was at the right place at the right time.

The morning of September 11, 2001 saw the World Trade Center in New York under attack and United Flight 93 crashing into a Pennsylvania field.   Then at 10:10am American Flight 77 hit the Pentagon.

The nose of the plane that struck the building hit the rear of the personnel area.  There was an explosion and fireball.  Read more…