Tag Archives: thought

Building on our expectations

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.” Mark Twain made that observation years ago when jokingly offering his philosophy on what it takes to stay healthy.  Obviously, his expectations for lasting health were not too high.

Today we are treated to a similar message through various sources that a disease-free life is practically impossible to maintain without the intervention of diets, drugs, exercise routines, therapies, and more.  With the constant barrage in media to “do this to stay healthy,”  we are accepting a subtle, but relentless sub-message that illness is inevitable.

What are your health prospects?  It is an important question.  If living by a “Murphy’s Law” mentality you are essentially portending anything that can go wrong will happen to you at some point in time adding to a life full of doubt and anxiety.

On the other hand, giving your consent to living a life grounded by spiritual, guiding principles that supersede health uncertainties empowers you to be the expression of wellness.  Read more…

Thinking Faster, Higher, Stronger

At times aging seems like an Olympic sport. Successfully maneuvering through this time of life depends on a certain amount of preparation, perseverance and endurance. It can be a Herculean effort that requires not a little confidence.

“Perhaps two-thirds of all the people who have ever lived to the age of 65 are alive today.” Peter Peterson’s, Gray Dawn, points out some sobering statistics about the aging of the world’s population and its impact on society.  It’s unchartered territory.

And that’s what makes preparing for the “golden years” such a challenge.  This many people living this long is a relatively recent phenomenon. Never have so many faced this situation. And it is creating a lot of angst for individuals and planners.

By what standard do we qualify as old?  Read more…

Can you think your way to better health?

“Now think, men, think!”

Professor Harold Hill’s desperate plea as he stands before his ill-prepared River City Boy’s Band with a broken pool cue for a director’s baton, is the iconic and ironic highlight of “The Music Man,” the endearing stage and film musical.

cropped-HealthInkLogo-1.jpgHaving convinced the gullible parents that he could produce a band and taken their money for instruments and uniforms, the lovable con artist reluctantly turns to his own confidence scam, the “Think System,” in his desperate attempt to avoid the wrath of the townspeople as they are about to hear the not-so-melodious sounds of their children’s instruments.

Thinking actually had little to do with the scheme the professor devised. He was literally as well as figuratively handcuffed by a lack of musical know-how. Producing musical concord is a science, involving knowledge of the rules of harmony and their implementation. Ignorance of the principles and procedures ensures cacophony.

Health can be viewed in much the same way.  Read more…

Who’s at the Controls of Your Life?

HealthInkLogo (1)Fifty years ago this week, an incredible journey successfully concluded on an airport runway in Columbus, Ohio. Jerrie Mock had just completed a 22,800 mile trek in her Cessna 180 Skywagon, affectionately nicknamed Three Eight Charlie. She was the first woman to fly solo around the world. My family and I were at the airport when she landed, along with a few thousand other eager fans, including Mrs. John Glenn, Mrs. Scott Carpenter, the governor and other dignitaries.  It was a big deal for women, aviation, and a testament to the human spirit. The triumph of Mock’s 29 ½ day journey is owed in large part to her courage, determination and know-how along with her methodical preparations. She knew what it took to succeed and for her dream of flying around the world to flourish. “If you want to do it, find out all the issues, study, and if it’s what you really want, if it is, do it,” says Mock in a recent interview with CarolAnn Garratt.  Sounds like good advice for fulfilling life’s goals. She goes on to note, however, “You may have misconceptions about what it is.” That’s a good point.   Read more…